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The 22 Things You Simply Must Do In South America

A brief (sort of) recap of our time in South America

Written on
April 26, 2017
Travel

Experience These Awesome Things To Do In South America

First off, "why 22?" I hear you ask. Well, these are the 22 things that we did in South America that gave us the most memorable 4 months of our lives!
Llamas in Bolivia, South America
Wild Llamas aren't the only things that make South America so awesome, but they do help!

Maybe for some, it took 21 things, or 23, or 57 or 92. For us, it was 22. I would hate to imagine I would ever have missed out on a single one of these things to do in South America! I know there’s more to do and see and experience, seeing as South America is such a diverse continent.

In the North, you’re wearing flips flops and factor 50 sunscreen, and in the South, you’re wearing 2nd hand charity shop navy blue tracksuits and huddling in a blanket outside of Ushuaia airport.

One minute you’re at sea level and then a 12-hour bus ride later you’re at the highest administrative city in the world.

But one thing that never changed for me was the kindness, patience and generosity that we experienced from people along the way. It never faltered, not once! Even in Colombia where apparently everyone is a drug dealer and wants to kidnap you for ransom (by the way Colombia is the most misjudged country in the world!).

So please read this list and take notes and maybe add a few to your own bucket list of things to do in South America. But just remember one thing ...

It is the people of South America that make it the place that it is. It is the people that made these experiences so memorable and it is because of the people there that I will forever hold our 4 months spent there with such fondness in my heart.

So in absolutely no particular order, let’s begin!

1. Live like a native in the Amazon rainforest

We spent 3 days cruising down ancient Amazonian tributaries looking for pythons, dolphins, caiman, sloths and monkeys. The evenings were filled with swimming in the river and the nights lying in hammocks listening to the deafening call of howler monkeys.

I held a caiman in my bare hands, then drank terrible Brazilian beer and spear-fished in the dark hours of the night. Our guide taught us how to fish for piranha and how for hundreds of years the natives had used trees to communicate with each other.

I left the Amazon tired, sunburnt and eaten alive by bugs ... I would not hesitate to go back again.

2. Cruise down the Amazon on a river boat – just not quite how we did it

I have already opened my heart up to our experience of 7 days going down the Amazon on a local ferry. It’s something I don’t think I have the heart to do again, so just make sure you read the article. If you get the chance then do it, but just one piece of advice, take your own food!

Amazon riverboat cruise, things to do in South America

3. Amaze yourself with the view of Rio de Janeiro from the top of Sugarloaf mountain

You can spend hours walking the streets of Rio and spending long afternoons lying on the never-ending Copacabana beach. But for me, the best way to truly appreciate the beauty of this city is to get the cable cart to the top of Sugarloaf mountain, find the not-so-secret bar hidden amongst the trees, order a drink and a burger and gaze out across the city in style.

4. Almost drown in a waterfall at the Iguazu Falls

What an incredible moment this was! The park borders both Argentina and Brazil, and from all accounts we were told that the Argentinian side is the way to go, and so we did. From our experience, if you go then be sure to also go from this side, and spend the extra money on a boat that takes you under the waterfall. The power of the waterfalls is phenomenal, so go prepared!

Iguazu falls, South America

5. Get lost in Tijuca national park

So few people seem to visit this place when they’re in Rio, and I can’t imagine why. It’s literally vast and it feels so ancient. We got some great shots in there as well. We did get lost for a couple of hours which was fun, but luckily we found our way back as Cazzy decided to take a hypo and we’d almost run out of sugar.

Tijuca National Park, South America

6. Buenos Aires – Experience all of Europe in just one city ... Wait what!?

After 2 weeks being going down the Amazon and being in the rainforest, we quickly found ourselves in Buenos Aires, and what a culture shock it is! It literally feels like we were right back home, seeing as all the buildings are a myriad of European architecture; one minute you feel like you’re in France, and next in the middle of Berlin. It’s a fantastically diverse city, and the best way to experience it is to take one of the free walking tours.

7. Let your imagination wild on the Bolivian salt flats

You must have seen pictures from people on the salt flats in Bolivia, and it’s likely you will at least recognise them, check out a couple of our own below. I can’t remember anywhere else I’ve been that you can lie on the floor like a child and play with toys and for it to be considered normal! So much fun and endless possibilities. Our props of choice: Godzilla and The Incredible Hulk.

Fun on the Bolivian salt flats 1, South America
Fun on the Bolivian salt flats 2, South America

8. Trek to Marshall Glacier in Ushuaia

After a painstaking 3 and a half hour uphill trek we found ourselves at the top of a ski slope in the southernmost city in the world; just to realise that the ski season had long gone and there wasn’t much of the glacier left. This didn’t stop me from making the most of it, and this has to be one of my fondest life memories so far as I made the most of the situation and decided to slide butt-first down my first ever glacier!

9. Hear the roar of Perito Moreno Glacier

This is one of Patagonia's most infamous tourist spots, and it’s not surprising. Giant blocks of ice drop off throughout the day and as they hit the water it lets out an echoing roar, similar to thunder in the distance. It’s really cool to see, and a place you’re unlikely to ever be able to visit elsewhere.

Perito Moreno Glacier, things to do in South America

10. Stay with locals on Couchsurfer!

We didn’t try Couchsurfer until we reached Santiago in Chile, which was about 2 months into our trip. But we’d experienced nothing but good-natured kindness from the Chileans and thought it must be worth a go. Our hosts, Carlos and Gabi, were awesome and they took us clubbing and taught us how to make Caipirinha and how to Salsa dance. I’m pretty sure you can’t get an experience like that elsewhere! So if you’re feeling confident then go for it, meeting and staying with locals will allow you to meet some truly amazing people.

11. Wander deep into the mountains at Cajon de Maipo

So few people get to experience this awesome thing to do in South America and I consider ourselves truly lucky to have been able to go. We decided to rent a car from Santiago, and it was only because of the people we stayed with from Couchsurfer that we were able to get this advice! After driving for an hour along muddy snowy roads in a gutless 1-litre rental car, we found ourselves in the middle of nowhere surrounding by snow-capped mountains and resting in natural hot spring baths with not a single person around except for 3 local workers. On the way out we did get stuck and the workers had to help push the car out of the mud (and in doing so I covered them in mud as the wheels spun it up at them), but you can ignore that minor issue.

Cajon de Maipo, South America

12. Roadtrip Chile in a cheap rental car

That same rental car from Cajon del Maipo drove us over 800 miles over 4 days through the heart of Chile where we got to see even more of the “off the beaten track” sights that tourists don’t normally get to see. This included volcanoes, waterfalls and vast inland lakes. We were happy to make the most of it too, as Chile has by far the best roads you’re likely to find elsewhere on the continent.

Ojos Del Caburgua, things to do in South America
Ojos del Caburgua is a treat that so few people get to witness when travelling through Chile

13. Star gaze in the Atacama

Again, the kindness of the local Chileans won us over as our host for the night took us outside and gave us a personal lesson about the stars in the sky and allowed us to use his own telescopes to look at them. Without pollution and clouds, the Atacama desert in northern Chile is one of the best spots in the world to look at the skies, and as your eyes adjust you get the unique opportunity to view millions of different stars that you never get the opportunity to witness back home.

14. Summit Torres del Paine at sunrise

Picture spending a night in a freezing cold tent after a long day of hiking, to then find yourself being forced out of bed at 4am to climb for another hour and a half to the summit of a mountain. Picture the exhaustion and weariness. And then picture yourself at the base of what is known as the Three Torres, looking across a sheltered bowl of water thousands of meters above sea level, and watching it light up to different colours as the sun slowly crests over the horizon. This was my all-time favourite moment from 4 months in South America. If you get the chance then you have to go. Perhaps the exhaustion makes it all the more rewarding, but either way be sure to take a sleeping bag so you can watch the sunrise in warmth. Just check out the guide I wrote here.

Torres del Paine, South America

15. Give back to the locals in Peru

There’s a hostel in Lima, Peru, where you get the choice to volunteer every Saturday by taking food to the poorer citizens that live in the “slums” of the city. It’s dreadful really as those living behind the wall are not allowed into the richer parts of the city, and if the police spot them they are escorted back. We went and helped give out food, and meeting the happy smiling mothers and children was really heart-warming and it’s great to know initiatives like those are underway, but the problem does seem to stretch quite far in the city. Either way, it was a fantastic experience and a real eye-opener, so if you find yourself in Lima then stay in the same hostel. It also helps that it’s an awesome place to stay and really cheap!

16. Fail at trying to Samba in Brazil

In case you’ve never tried it before yourself, Samba dancing is hard ... really hard! It’s also exhausting, and for someone like me, with no rhythm and white skin, you do feel a bit out of place at a local traditional Friday night Samba party. But it was great fun and allowed us to really immerse ourselves in the local culture.  I’m grateful for our hostel’s owner being generous enough to invite us along so that we could make fools of ourselves.

17. Try your hand at paragliding in La Paz

Being something we’ve always wanted to try, and despite an ever-depleting reserve of funds, we decided to put our trust in 2 locals and head off paragliding. And after a 2-hour drive, and one or two near-death experiences, we were airborne at 4,000 feet high above the Bolivian capital of La Paz. My instructor caught some sort of air current and we just kept going higher and higher until I started to feel nauseous. But regardless, the rush and the views were spectacular, and even though I have a fear of heights, it didn’t bother me for one second.

 

18. Get a Peruvian to teach you how to surf

With 3 weeks surfing in Bali coming up, I decided to get a local to see if he could teach me how to actually stand on a surfboard; and for less than £20 I had my own private 2-hour session in the warm Peruvian waters off the beach of Lima. I can only marvel at his patience, and despite the odds, he pulled it off and I actually managed to stand up a few times. Bali, here I come.

19. Become the Richard Branson of your own Island on Isla del Sol

Who doesn’t dream of finding themselves atop their own private island in the sunny Caribbean?! Well, I guess I came a bit close with Isla del Sol. After an hour's hike, I reached one of the highest points of this island that lies in Lake Titicaca which borders Bolivia and Peru. The views were stunning and the weather was great, what more do you need! You can reach this island by ferry that runs twice a day back and forth from mainland Bolivia. We stayed a night in our own private beachside hut and ate food at a local restaurant.  It's fair to say, this is definitely one of the most underrated things to do in South America.

Isla del Sol, South America

20. Visit Mars – it’s not as far as you think!

In the Atacama desert in northern Chile, there’s a place they call Moon Valley, and it’s not surprising as it bears a resemblance to the blank expanse of the moon, or to us, planet Mars. There’s plenty of tours that run there, and just make sure you’re ready for the sunset, check out our shot below.

Moon Valley, South America

21. Get kissed and thrown around by a female Bolivian wrestler

I would never have guessed that I’d write that sentence at any point in my life! But it did happen, I promise. In La Paz, there’s a curiously entertaining event that occurs where native Bolivian women dress up and fight like WWE wrestlers in the middle of a school auditorium. Well worth a trip and great fun for the family, just don’t mess with them. Oh, and if they start walking around the crowd, don’t make eye contact or else like me you’ll get a nice juicy kiss.

Female Bolivian wrestlers, South America

22. Help save a life in La Paz

After 3 months in this continent, we thought it right to give something back, and after generous donations from friends and relatives back home we were able to donate £500 to a centre in La Paz that supports around 150 children who are close to life-and-death complications due to a lack of type 1 diabetic care from their government. Hearing their stories was heart-wrenching and I’m so glad we helped just a small amount. But after that day we vowed to do more and we have a few projects underway that will hopefully make much more of an impact on their lives. This was by far the most worthwhile thing we achieved in our time there and helped show me just how lucky we truly are in the UK.

Well, there you have it, my ultimate list of 22 things to do in South America. If you have things to add then please write them in the comment section below, as I would love to read them, as I’m sure others visiting this continent would also find them useful.

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